Kanchanaburi


At around 19,500 square kilometres Kanchanaburi is Thailand’s third largest province. Bordering Myanmar, the province is famed for its mountains and hills. Only 130 kilometres from Bangkok it takes two hours to get to Kanchanaburi by bus making it a popular destination for day trippers from the capital. 150 kilometres west of Bangkok, the region is especially famed for the Bridge Over the River Kwae, scene of numerous war atrocities during the Japanese administration of Thailand. The building of the bridge led to the deaths of 80,000 Asian labourers and 13,000 Allied Prisoners of War. Kanchanaburi’s landscapes are at once rugged and picturesque.  Kanchanaburi’s national parks are ideal for adventures into the province’s natural beauty. The area has hydro-electric power and a series of dammed reservoirs which provide opportunities for activities such as boating and fishing. Kanchanaburi is home to the Erawan Waterfall – a 7-tier fall of astounding beauty, as well as Sai Yok Waterfalls - the focal point of the 500-square-kilometre Sai Yok National Park comprising evergreen, bamboo and teak forest against a mountainous backdrop. The area is famed for activities like trekking, cave exploration, elephant riding and canoeing.


Attractions in Kanchanaburi


Sort by
0

Kanchanaburi War Cemetery


Although the Bridge on the River Kwai (Saphan Mae Nam Kwae) has become a symbol of the brutality of the Second World War, the War Cemeteries are evidence of its effect. Kanchanaburi has two cemeteries with the graves of captured prisoners of war, the Chung Kai Allied War Memorial and the Kanchanaburi Allied War Cemetery. Chung Kai Allied War...

More

1

The JEATH War Museum


If the cemeteries bear witness to the carnage of the ‘Death Railway’, the JEATH Museum bears witness to the suffering of those that fell during its construction. The ‘open-air’ JEATH (Japan, England, Australia, Thailand and Holland) Museum was built in 1977 by a Thai abbot in the style of the huts used to imprison prisoners...

More

2

Hellfire Pass Memorial Museum


Hellfire Pass is a 500 meters long and 26 meters deep section of rock that was dug out by Prisoners of War intended to allow the ‘Death Railway’ to continue its route from Bangkok to Rangoon. Soldiers were forced to remove the rock using no more than picks, hammers and their bare hands. Of the 1,000 Australian and British soldiers who...

More

3

Sai Yok Waterfalls


The Sai Yok Waterfalls (Sai Yok Yai and Sai Yok Noi) form the focal point of Sai Yok National Park - a 500-square kilometer park offering evergreen, bamboo and teak forest against a mountainous backdrop teaming with wildlife such as bats (the Khun Kitti Bat – the smallest bat in the world), tigers, wild pigs, deer and birds. Sai Yok Yai Sai...

More

4

Prasat Muang Sing Historical Park


Prasat Muang Singh is a Khmer town in Kanchanaburi province. It is around 45 kilometers from Kanchanaburi city. Built around the 12th century on the Khwae Noi River, the site was most likely an outpost of the Khmer ‘Muang Singh’ empire that protected the Khmer frontier. It was also likely a centre for trade. Built of...

More

5

Bridge over the River Kwai


For many foreign visitors the Bridge on the River Kwai (Saphan Mae Nam Kwae) is probably one of the most famous of Thailand’s attractions. A simple black iron bridge spanning the Kwai Yai River, it has no special features, nor is it impressive in terms of size or design. What is important about this bridge is its history - a history that has...

More

6

The Bridge Over the River Kwae


For many foreign visitors the Bridge on the River Kwai (Saohan Mae Nam Kwae) is probably one of the most famous of Thailand’s attractions, but probably the country’s least spectacular. A simple black iron bridge spanning the Khwe Yai River, it has no special features, nor is it impressive in terms of size or design. What is important...

More

7

Thung Yai Naresuan and Huai Kha Khaeng


The Thungyai Naresuan Wildlife Sanctuary and Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuary cover three provinces including Uthai Thani, Kanchanaburi and Tak provinces in western Thailand. At 622,200 hectares combined, they form the largest protected area in Southeast Asia, and were listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1991. The Thung Yai Naresuan...

More

Hotel Booking